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What’s Really Causing Your Body Pain

What’s Really Causing Your Body Pain

This morning, as I set out on my usual walk, I felt a tightness and mild body pain in my left hip and knee. It wasn’t too alarming at first; I managed to get back home without the pain worsening. However, the moment I stepped into my kitchen to make a cup of coffee and started thinking about my to-do list, I took a step with my left leg and nearly fell over. The sharp pain that shot through me took my breath away, and I screamed out in anger and frustration. Good thing my dog is elderly and deaf, and wasn’t startled by my outburst. Then my tears came.

At that moment, I decided not to fight the pain. I allowed it to be there, and I let my emotions, and tears, flow freely. Within minutes, the pain disappeared as quickly as it had come. I easily walked over to make my coffee, no longer needing to limp or use the countertops as a crutch. The tightness was gone, like magic. This sudden shift made me curious: what exactly was the cause?

After checking in with my intuition and reflecting on what happened, I realized that the pain was more emotional and energetic in nature. It became clear that my thoughts about all the tasks I “had” to get done today had triggered the sharp pain. This experience reminded me of several key lessons I’ve learned over time, which I often share with my clients:

Be Curious

Curiosity is a powerful tool. Instead of immediately seeking to eliminate discomfort, approach it with curiosity. First, allow it to be, without resistance. Later, do some self-reflection and ask yourself what might be causing it. This can lead to insights about your physical and emotional well-being that you might otherwise overlook. Everything is Connected Our bodies and minds are not separate entities but parts of an interconnected whole. Physical sensations can often be tied to your emotional and mental states. Recognizing this interconnectedness can help you understand and address the root causes of your discomfort.

There’s Usually an Energetic Emotional Component

Most physical sensations are not purely physical. They often have an emotional or energetic component. For example, stress and anxiety can manifest as tightness or pain in various parts of your body. By acknowledging and addressing these emotional aspects, you can alleviate the physical symptoms, and in many cases, completely resolve them.

Mental/Emotional/Energetic Clutter

Sometimes, the discomfort we feel in our bodies is due to mental, emotional, or energetic clutter that needs to be cleared. These sensations can persist and even intensify until you address the underlying issues. This clutter can stem from daily stressors, unresolved emotions, or lingering negative energy. Deeper Trauma and Getting Support At times, the pain and discomfort we experience can be indicative of deeper trauma. Our bodies hold onto past experiences, and these can manifest as chronic physical issues. Addressing these traumas, often with the help of someone to guide you in that process, can lead to profound healing and relief. I’ve seen profound improvements in quality of life working with clients to support their healing from trauma.

Body Sensations as Communication

Body sensations and emotions are ways our body communicates with us. By listening to these signals rather than resisting or ignoring them, you can gain valuable insights into your health and well-being. For instance, trying to push through the pain without understanding its cause can lead to further issues, whereas addressing it holistically can bring about healing.

Mind-Body and Energetic/Nervous System Stabilizing Tools

Using mind-body practices and tools to stabilize your nervous system can be incredibly effective in managing and alleviating pain. Techniques that I recommend, like energy healing, mindfulness, meditation, guided imagery, breathwork, and gentle movement, can help you process and release stored emotions and energy, leading to a more balanced and pain-free life.

Embrace Peace, Happiness and Productivity

By listening to our bodies and addressing the emotional and energetic roots of our pain, we can cultivate more peace, happiness, and productivity in our lives. Rather than being sidelined by pain and discomfort, we can move through life with greater ease and joy.

This morning’s experience was a powerful reminder of the lessons I’ve learned and continue to share with my clients. Your body is wise and communicative, and by paying attention and addressing the underlying emotional and energetic causes of your discomfort, you can achieve pain relief and greater well-being. If you find yourself experiencing unexplained pain or discomfort, I encourage you to pause, be curious, and listen to what your body is trying to tell you. The insights you gain could lead to profound healing and transformation.

The Silent Strain: How Chronic Stress Deteriorates Your Body

The Silent Strain: How Chronic Stress Deteriorates Your Body

While stress is a natural response designed to keep you alert and safe, the prolonged strain of chronic stress acts as a silent strain deteriorating your body and harming your health. Stress is inevitable for many of us in the fast-paced world we live in. So, the key to managing your stress levels and staying ahead of any detrimental effects stress can have on your body and health is to understand more about chronic stress and how it shows up, its connection to burnout, and the role of the parasympathetic nervous system in maintaining your overall health. Keep reading to learn more.

The Nature of Chronic Stress

Stress is a physiological response that dates back to our ancient ancestors. It evolved as a survival mechanism, helping our predecessors react quickly to life or death situations. This “fight or flight” response floods the body with hormones like cortisol and adrenaline, preparing you to either confront or flee from a threat. Nowadays, you still experience this sympathetic, or “fight or flight” response in times of stress or perceived danger. However, it can become chronic if, for example, you’re in a high pressure work environment and putting out fires throughout the day, most days. 

In moderation, stress can be beneficial, enhancing our performance and boosting our responsiveness. Unlike acute stress, which is short-lived and often beneficial, chronic stress is persistent and ongoing. It can be triggered by various sources like work-related pressures, financial worries, relationship problems and health concerns. As you juggle these stressors day in and day out, your body struggles to return to a state of equilibrium, leading to a range of health issues.

Burnout is the Culmination of Chronic Stress

One of the most concerning outcomes of chronic stress is burnout. Burnout is a state of emotional, physical and mental exhaustion caused by prolonged exposure to high levels of stress. It often affects individuals who are deeply committed to their work or responsibilities, pushing themselves beyond their limits without allowing for proper rest and recovery.

The symptoms of burnout are multifaceted. Physically, you may experience fatigue, headaches and gastrointestinal problems. Mentally, you may feel detached, experience reduced concentration and exhibit signs of cynicism and negativity. Emotionally, burnout can manifest as a sense of hopelessness and a loss of motivation. Left unaddressed, burnout can severely impact your quality of life and your ability to function well both personally and professionally.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System: A Balancing Act

To understand the impact of chronic stress on your body, we must also explore and understand the role of the autonomic nervous system, specifically the parasympathetic branch. The autonomic nervous system regulates bodily functions that occur unconsciously, like your heart rate, digestion and respiratory rate. The parasympathetic nervous system acts as a counterbalance to the “fight or flight” response, promoting relaxation and restoration. It’s often referred to as the “rest and digest” response. 

When you experience stress, the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the “fight or flight” response, becomes dominant. This activation is vital for immediate survival, but it should be followed by a period of parasympathetic dominance to allow your body to recover and repair. It’s all about balance. 

Unfortunately, chronic stress can disrupt this balance. With the sympathetic system constantly in overdrive, your body doesn’t get the chance to return to its resting state, leading to a cascade of health problems.

The Physical Toll of Chronic Stress

Stress affects all systems of the body including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, nervous and reproductive systems. It can weaken the immune system, making you more susceptible to infections and diseases. Additionally, prolonged exposure to stress hormones like cortisol can lead to high inflammation, a known driver of various chronic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and autoimmune disorders. Increased heart rate and blood pressure, common responses to stress, can strain the heart and blood vessels, potentially leading to hypertension and an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Mental and Emotional Ramifications

The effects of chronic stress extend beyond your body, or  physical realm, affecting your mental and emotional well-being. Persistent stress can contribute to the development of anxiety disorders and depression. And the constant activation of stress pathways in the brain can lead to structural changes that disrupt healthy cognitive functions, including memory and decision-making.

Mitigating Chronic Stress: Strategies for Resilience

The good news is that you can take steps to mitigate the impact of chronic stress on your body and mind. Building resilience is essential to navigate the challenges of modern life while preserving your well-being. Here are a few strategies to consider:

Mindfulness and Meditation: Practices like mindfulness and meditation can help activate your parasympathetic nervous system, promoting relaxation and reducing stress hormones. These techniques encourage you to be present, fostering a sense of calm amidst the chaos.

Energy Healing: Energy healing sessions also activate the “rest and digest” parasympathetic response in your body. The practitioner guides you into this deeply relaxed state, where the body is then better able to heal itself on all levels: mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. 

Regular Exercise: Physical activity is a powerful stress reducer. Engaging in regular exercise helps you release endorphins, your  natural mood elevators. Exercise also provides a healthy outlet for your pent-up energy and tension. A daily walk is a simple way to start your exercise routine.

Quality Sleep: Adequate sleep is crucial for restoring your body and mind. Establishing a regular sleep schedule and creating a conducive sleep environment can improve your sleep quality and help manage stress.

Healthy Lifestyle Choices: A balanced diet and proper hydration can support your body’s resilience to stress. Avoiding excessive caffeine and alcohol consumption can also contribute to better stress management.

Social Connections: Building and maintaining strong social connections can provide emotional support during challenging times. Sharing experiences and seeking guidance from your friends and family can alleviate feelings of isolation.

Your Next Steps for Stress and Burnout Relief

Chronic stress is a silent strain that has the potential to erode your physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being. Understanding the effects of chronic stress on your body and recognizing the signs of burnout is crucial for taking proactive measures to protect your health. 

If you’re curious about the level of stress or burnout in your life and how detrimental it may be, take my complimentary “How Bad is My Burnout?” quiz to find out. The results will tell you the phase you might be in and what next steps to take to ensure your body’s health and wellbeing don’t deteriorate any further. 

Additionally, start nurturing your parasympathetic nervous system and adopting one or more of the stress-reduction strategies noted above. Practiced on a consistent basis, you can build resilience and have a healthier, more balanced life in an increasingly demanding world.

 

Photo by jeshoots – Unsplash